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SOLD! Old Heathkit Parts

Post  NEW222 on Tue Nov 20, 2018 9:35 pm

Hi all. In my last buy, these parts were all included. I was just told the tool was for adjusting pots in old Heathkit radios. As for the servo parts, I know not too much other than it is not complete. There is some sort of 'dial' under the envelope. I do not honestly know what the parts all are. Other than that, if there is any interest in the parts, please let me know or they will hit the ol' bin in the sky....
Old Heathkit Parts Heath_10
Old Heathkit Parts Heath_11


Last edited by NEW222 on Fri Nov 23, 2018 4:35 pm; edited 1 time in total
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SOLD! Re: Old Heathkit Parts

Post  Cribbs74 on Tue Nov 20, 2018 9:54 pm

Admin (Jacob) is big into vintage radios. Do not toss them until you can talk to him first.
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SOLD! Re: Old Heathkit Parts

Post  NEW222 on Tue Nov 20, 2018 10:26 pm

Okay, thanks for the heads up. I won't toss yet then.
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SOLD! Re: Old Heathkit Parts

Post  Levent Suberk on Wed Nov 21, 2018 1:32 am

Very interesting Heathkit servo parts. RCM&E magazine Retro Ramblings column writer Shaun Garrity has a web site, interesting 2.4 GHz conversions of vintage radios:

http://www.mccrash-racing.co.uk/sc/propo.htm
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SOLD! Re: Old Heathkit Parts

Post  Forgetful John on Wed Nov 21, 2018 2:58 pm

I had a Heathkit RC rig back in the day.  Twelve channel, I believe.  Also, if I remember correctly it was 27-Mhz, since it was a Citizen's Band radio.  Beautiful blue crinkle paint transmitter.  

RC Plane

The servos differed from what we use today in that the "feedback" from the output shaft turned a variable capacitor and nowadays I have seen them use variable resistors, such as a volume control knob.  In order to use a variable capacitor in this manner there would have to be an oscillator that it was "varying" in frequency which would have been compared to the input signal of the servo.  In comparison a variable resistor "varies" DC voltage, which simplifies and makes more dependable of a system.  On my system there was not a rotating shaft to which you mount a servo arm but two linear "sliders", going in opposite directions, sort of like a push and a pull.  This was actually handy to center the servo to where the sliders were opposite each other in mid-travel.   

The white nylon "tuning wand"that the OP has in the picture was for "trimming" the oscillator in each servo.  If it had had a metal tip it would not have been practical as the metal would have affected the tuning, no way would a screwdriver have worked.  No big deal since you had built the whole setup -- transmitter, receiver, servos.  

You had just built your own CB transmitter and receiver!  Do kids (or older) do this nowadays?  

Anyway, it was not that great of a deal compared to today because the servos would "hunt" if mis-adjusted, or the temperature changed, or the carburetor throttle linkage was metallic.  One particular "feature" was that it might change settings depending on whether the wing, with its' aileron servo was assembled to the plane or just the fuselage was sitting on your bench.  

When Futaba servos became available it was a major upgrade.  

Back in the day it was possible to buy as an alternate to the kit that you built yourself, a factory-built item that normally worked much better.  I have spent many a day repairing -- well, actually, re-soldering kit-built Heathkit color televisions.  Usually they might have two or three problems that would manifest intermittantly, a good solid whack with your fist would make them go again!  

Heathkit ended up being bought by Zenith.  There was also LaFayette which marketed electronic kits.  You could build your own tube-type CB transceiver among other things.  I built a Conar brand VTVM (vacuum-tube volt meter), AM radio and a tube-type black-and-white TV when I was a kid.  We also built our own bicycles from parts if our Father was not very affluent.  Perhaps I am showing my age but nowadays this is not done much anymore.  

I apologize for my verbosity and if there is an omission, it's because I'm...
Forgetful John                                      

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SOLD! Re: Old Heathkit Parts

Post  Admin on Thu Nov 22, 2018 3:37 am

Hello Chancey,

I didn't want to reply until I could have a good look at what you have. It looks like you have parts for some old servos, maybe enough to assemble one.

It never hurts to have another tuning pick around, they tend to snap off easily if you happen to apply just a little too much force.

Someone else could probably get more use out of the servos/parts, even if just for display.

Let me know if it comes down to the point of tossing the stuff in the trash, I could probably find a home for it.

Thanks, Jacob

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SOLD! Re: Old Heathkit Parts

Post  GallopingGhostler on Thu Nov 22, 2018 10:11 am

Back in the late 1970's, I purchased a Charlie's R/C (Bill Cannon's wife, did the kit side) Cannon 510 4 channel mini radio kit including 2 servos. The transmitter deck was already built and tuned so the modeler wouldn't have to, an FCC requirement for assembly by non-licensed technicians. I completed the encoder, wiring and hardware parts assembling. The receiver and servos I assembled and soldered all parts as they came with empty circuit boards. The radio was more compact and refined than the earlier Heathkits, but similar in assembly.
Old Heathkit Parts Charli10

Here are the then "mini" Bantam servos mounted in Q-Tee. This is after I replaced the Cannon cord and connector with Futaba "J" cord and connector with a different radio system for guidance:
Old Heathkit Parts Cannon10


NEW222 wrote:Hi all. In my last buy, these parts were all included. I was just told the tool was for adjusting pots in old Heathkit radios. Old Heathkit Parts Heath_10
The tool would be used on the transmitter and receiver, I believe. You had IF (intermediate frequency) transformer cans and coils with a ferrite tunable core, and trimmer capacitors, I believe. Nylon tool was needed for adjusting as use of say a metal screwdriver tip would affect readings.

NEW222 wrote:As for the servo parts, I know not too much other than it is not complete. There is some sort of 'dial' under the envelope. I do not honestly know what the parts all are. Other than that, if there is any interest in the parts, please let me know or they will hit the ol' bin in the sky....
Old Heathkit Parts Heath_11
You have what looks like 1 complete feedback potentiometer (variable resistor) on the left and 2 potentiometer circuit boards that form the bottom of the potentiometer, one on the left and one on the right. These are the small circular circuit boards with 3 solder tabs and a deposited resistive film on the other side of the board. They are missing the mechanical portion with shaft, housing and wiper. It is missing the housing with wiper element and shaft that was fitted with a gear. Or, they are trimmer potentiometers with a thin wiper element on top. they appear to be too thin for that, and without additional photos showing the top side, appear to be only a part of potentiometer.

As the servo output shaft was turned by the motor, the geared potentiometer wiper element would move along the element, changing its resistance. The change in resistance was used for feedback.

You are also missing the miniature circuit board that went with the servo. (Or, it could be possible that Heathkit used an external circuit board or circuit was a part of the receiver board.) Plus, screws are missing.

Yes, the servo does appear to be incomplete and would probably better serve for parts to repair whole and already assembled servos.
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SOLD! Re: Old Heathkit Parts

Post  GWILLIEFOX on Fri Nov 23, 2018 1:20 pm

Oh boy do I remember Charlie. Smart as a whip and cute as a bug. Back in those days Toledo was a real event with real kits, lots of engines and showgirls in the booths. Guys dressed up to attend. If you've been going to Toledo in recent years and think there are crowds, you don't even have any idea what a real crowd is.
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SOLD! Re: Old Heathkit Parts

Post  NEW222 on Fri Nov 23, 2018 4:36 pm

Parts gone.
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SOLD! Re: Old Heathkit Parts

Post  GallopingGhostler on Fri Nov 23, 2018 8:46 pm

Forgetful John wrote:The servos differed from what we use today in that the "feedback" from the output shaft turned a variable capacitor and nowadays I have seen them use variable resistors, such as a volume control knob.  In order to use a variable capacitor in this manner there would have to be an oscillator that it was "varying" in frequency which would have been compared to the input signal of the servo.  In comparison a variable resistor "varies" DC voltage, which simplifies and makes more dependable of a system.  On my system there was not a rotating shaft to which you mount a servo arm but two linear "sliders", going in opposite directions, sort of like a push and a pull. This was actually handy to center the servo to where the sliders were opposite each other in mid-travel.
John, your system was indeed an earlier one. One thing nice about Heatkit is at the time, if one was handy with his hands, could read schematics and properly handle a soldering iron, could save a good bit by going kit. That's what made Heathkit popular back then. I even remember a kit console organ. I think your radio system is described by these the 1968 Heathkit catalogue pages.
Old Heathkit Parts 1968_h10

Old Heathkit Parts 1968_h11

Servos mention in the description they are variable capacitor feedback.

Forgetful John wrote:Anyway, it was not that great of a deal compared to today because the servos would "hunt" if mis-adjusted, or the temperature changed, or the carburetor throttle linkage was metallic.  One particular "feature" was that it might change settings depending on whether the wing, with its' aileron servo was assembled to the plane or just the fuselage was sitting on your bench.
I remember with the earlier AM radios like my Cannon, that one would make sure of no metal to metal contact in linkages. I could take a screwdriver, run it up and down the landing gear music wire and make the servos jitter.

Forgetful John wrote:Heathkit ended up being bought by Zenith.
I remember that. You started to see computer kits, Zenith monitors, and etc. They even had training courses you could buy.

Forgetful John wrote:There was also LaFayette which marketed electronic kits.  You could build your own tube-type CB transceiver among other things.  I built a Conar brand VTVM (vacuum-tube volt meter), AM radio and a tube-type black-and-white TV when I was a kid.  We also built our own bicycles from parts if our Father was not very affluent.  Perhaps I am showing my age but nowadays this is not done much anymore.
Yes, I remember the Lafayette catalogue. In 1966, my father was the electric shop teacher at Waianae High School in Hawaii for a couple years, before he moved to social studies. I helped him by assembling and soldering a small electron tube tester kit with about 15 sockets on top, a Philco 5 tube AM table radio kit for the school. Kids vandalized the cafeteria stage lighting system console. I helped to repair by splicing back the some dozen wires they cut with a wire cutter. Even etched my own printed circuit boards and made a 1 transistor and 2 transistor radio, put them in a Radio Shack project box for hand carry.

He also got me for gifts for I and my brother, Ohlson Electronics crystal radio receivers. I also got a Graymark 3 tube regenerative radio kit with plug in interchangeable frequency coil socket for broadcast, 80, 40, 20 and 15 meters, and a year or two later, a Graymark superheterodyne 5 tube radio with AM broadcast and 3.5 to 15 MHz shortwave bands.

So, you are not alone.
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SOLD! Re: Old Heathkit Parts

Post  Dave P. on Fri Nov 23, 2018 11:47 pm

Our first radio (well, Dad's and later mine) was a 1970 Heathkit.  The servos had two output options, rotary like we have now and linear.  Always seemed to me that the linear was better, but what do I know.  The pots in the servos were two piece, one was a dish that had a copper or brass piece in it, the other was a carbon wiper, if I remember right.  Ours was a little rambunctious until we had a real electrical engineer go over it.  After that it was rock solid.  He told us that the transmitter had one of the strongest signals of all radios ever made.  Ours was on 72.960, yellow and white.

It was a five channel with the the light blue wrinkle finish.  One weird thing about the sticks was that the throttle trim would move the stick.  Kraft sticks, if memory serves me right.  Sure wish I still had that radio.  When Dad passed, it seems to have evaporated, no one knows where it went.  Knowing Dad, he probably gave to some kid wanting to get into modeling.  If that's the case, I'm good with his decision.  I still have some of his old Bantam and Ace stuff though.  Great memories.
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SOLD! Re: Old Heathkit Parts

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