Cox Engines Forum
You are not logged in! Please login or register! Guests are limited to posting in the "General Questions (Guest Posting Allowed)" section only. Becoming a member is fast, easy and FREE!


Log in

I forgot my password

Search
 
 

Display results as :
 


Rechercher Advanced Search

Cox Engine of The Month
July-2017
Mark Boesen's

Nice original Babe Bee from a Super Cub 105, late fifties.



PAST WINNERS
CEF Traveling Engine

Tach Race 2017 Updates
Ready for Tach Race 2017?
Profile Scale Reed Speed
Gallery


Win This Engine!
The Traveling Prop
World of Aviation

rope-weave

View previous topic View next topic Go down

rope-weave

Post  roddie on Fri Nov 13, 2015 9:47 pm

One of many handy things my Grandfather knew how to do. He made this hitch. I wish I'd asked him to teach me.



Gramps had a boat similar to this one (same Science & Mechanics series-1950's/60's vintage) that he had someone build from the plans for him.



It was a little smaller and didn't have the walk-through bulkhead, dash-panel or windshield. It's hull was painted white with red accents toward the stern. The insides were natural wood, sealed with gloss spar-varnish. Power was a tiller-controlled Kiekhaefer-Mercury 10hp 2-stroke. This was probably the bow-line for that boat.


avatar
roddie
Top Poster
Top Poster

Posts : 4984
Join date : 2013-07-17
Age : 57
Location : N. Smithfield, Rhode Island

View user profile http://www.stilburnin.com

Back to top Go down

Re: rope-weave

Post  RknRusty on Fri Nov 13, 2015 10:01 pm

Here's your Granddad's eye loop. I've done it before, but can't recall the details. This guy does it without a fid. I think the one I remember was a multi-core rope that required the use of a fid to guide the weaving.
https://youtu.be/pLox_ajDGLo

_________________
Don't Panic!
...and never Ever think about how good you are at something...
while you're doing it!


My Hot Rock & Blues Playlist
avatar
RknRusty
Moderator

Posts : 10298
Join date : 2011-08-10
Age : 61
Location : South Carolina, USA

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: rope-weave

Post  roddie on Fri Nov 13, 2015 10:20 pm

Very cool Rusty! I'm not sure how my Gramps did it.. but the rope I have is natural fiber (jute?).. so I have to wonder how the end of the weave stays secured?? I guess it just tightens when tensioned.. and stays locked together.
avatar
roddie
Top Poster
Top Poster

Posts : 4984
Join date : 2013-07-17
Age : 57
Location : N. Smithfield, Rhode Island

View user profile http://www.stilburnin.com

Back to top Go down

Re: rope-weave

Post  RknRusty on Fri Nov 13, 2015 10:38 pm

roddie wrote:Very cool Rusty! I'm not sure how my Gramps did it.. but the rope I have is natural fiber (jute?).. so I have to wonder how the end of the weave stays secured?? I guess it just tightens when tensioned.. and stays locked together.
Tape it while you're weaving it, then just cut off the tip ends. Jute isn't going to allow any slippage.

_________________
Don't Panic!
...and never Ever think about how good you are at something...
while you're doing it!


My Hot Rock & Blues Playlist
avatar
RknRusty
Moderator

Posts : 10298
Join date : 2011-08-10
Age : 61
Location : South Carolina, USA

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: rope-weave

Post  pkrankow on Sat Nov 14, 2015 8:41 am

Short splicing twist 3 strand is easy. As long as the rope is not actually damaged used 3-strand rope will splice almost as easy new rope. (unlike braid on braid)

The first row is the hardest row. The video is very clear on that, except it doesn't show very clearly that he untwisted (loosened) the portion of rope contained in the eye about 1/2 twist when forming it so it doesn't try to figure-8 for the rest of its life. He untwists by how he holds the rope before forming the eye. Figure-8 tendencies are more a nuisance than anything else.

If the ends are not heat fused (and quite possibly if they are heat fused) wrap about an inch of the end of each strand in electrical tape, and then make the tape slightly pointed off the end of the strand. Don't spare the tape, and don't plan to save it either.

If the rope is particularly hard then use a tool to open the lay. (The rope in the video is rather soft nylon) A large diameter Phillips screwdriver (#3) is a fair choice that most people have. A tapered wooden pin is a better choice that most people can easily make out of any strong, dense, tight grained wood (figure about 6 inches long tapering from 3/4 inch to 1/8 inch, then ball ended or blunt pointed, the exact size is not very important as long as it is similar to the size of the strand in the rope)

Another tool that may be useful is a loop of stout wire or rod that is shaped like a large needle threader (diamond shaped) with a handle on it (I don't have one of these, but I have used one) A wire rope loop on a skinny handle is the same type of tool, as is having a piece of small rope/heavy cord handy.

In nylon rope, as shown in the video, 3-5 tucks is normal, I prefer 5 tucks before tapering in nylon. (Do not do less than 3 tucks on any material, natural fibers can use 3). Terminating the splice on separate layers is a tapering method that is both easy and clean. In practice tapering like that makes the splice much easier to handle vs ending the splice all at the same tuck.

The other tapering method is, after performing the splice, unlay the remainder of the strand and cut a taper into the strand, wax and relay the strand. Continue tucking until the taper is taken in. This is only necessary for rope that has to pass through certain machines like anchor winches, or block and tackle. Tapering the strand to finish the splice is preferred for natural fibers.

Binding the splice with waxed cord is always an option, if you want.
avatar
pkrankow
Diamond Member
Diamond Member

Posts : 2869
Join date : 2012-10-02
Location : Ohio

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: rope-weave

Post  OVERLORD on Sat Nov 14, 2015 11:16 am

I used to know how to make those eyes and things when I was sailing, although I didn't needed it in the engine room. I've seen sailors making eyes like that on steel cables using a spike.

A few times, I managed to make a rope ball used as a weight for a heaving line. Before closing the ball, you insert a piece of rag to have a bit of volume. Some people put nuts in the centre, so the heaving line would fly further but this was sometimes unpleasant for the one who had to catch the line!!



avatar
OVERLORD
Platinum Member
Platinum Member

Posts : 1134
Join date : 2013-03-19
Age : 51
Location : Normandy, France

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: rope-weave

Post  RknRusty on Sat Nov 14, 2015 11:37 am

I have my Dad's old Bluejacket manual from WWII. It can show you how to do about anything nautical. Great little book.

_________________
Don't Panic!
...and never Ever think about how good you are at something...
while you're doing it!


My Hot Rock & Blues Playlist
avatar
RknRusty
Moderator

Posts : 10298
Join date : 2011-08-10
Age : 61
Location : South Carolina, USA

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: rope-weave

Post  gcb on Sat Nov 14, 2015 4:24 pm

OVERLORD wrote:A few times, I managed to make a rope ball used as a weight for a heaving line. Before closing the ball, you insert a piece of rag to have a bit of volume. Some people put nuts in the centre, so the heaving line would fly further but this was sometimes unpleasant for the one who had to catch the line!!




Wow! It's been a long time since I made a monkey fist! A heaving line is usually used to pass a larger line that is too large and heavy to throw.

Nice illustrations.

George
avatar
gcb
Platinum Member
Platinum Member

Posts : 901
Join date : 2011-08-11
Location : Port Ewen, NY

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: rope-weave

Post  Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum