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Crash, bang wallop and crappy pictures.

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Crash, bang wallop and crappy pictures.

Post  ian1954 on Sat Jun 11, 2016 4:17 pm

This post is about my experiences getting back into control line (albeit from the Dark Side!)  and the trials and tribulations ensuing.

This is not intended to be a negative post, as this morning, I flew six sorties with the ACE+ and four with the Wizard. This is a tale about my learning experience and so, although some may see my efforts today as a disaster, I enjoyed it and I think anyone seeing a 61+ old bloke dining an impression of slipping on a banana and banging the back of his head on the ground would have too!

It is a little difficult flying solo with no observers and so to some extent I am finding it difficult to assess what I am doing wrong. The Ace+ is easy to fly level but a little fast and I have not yet managed a wing over. The first four flights today were to try and get me over the dizziness.  I found that keeping the plane in the tree line stopped that but one I was into the sky - if I didn't concentrate on the plane - I could feel the dizziness starting.

Anyway, on the fifth flight I got more aggressive with the roller coastering but had an uneasy feeling about it. Now excuse my simplicity here but you have to remember that my eyesight is not too good and a profile slabby thing thirty five feet away is not easy for me to see - even if it is bright yellow.

How do I explain this? Gentle ups and downs and I seem to be in control - when I increase the angle, I am fine with the ups but the downs seem to be not under my control. The lines seem taught but I seem to have to overdo things to prevent a nose dive.

Now here I am using a GoPro strapped to my noggin. It doesn't have zoom and I can't see the view finder. So excuse the production



There was no wind today but the ground was very wet. The plane hit the ground before I slipped on the imaginary banana skin so no excuses.

So onwards and upwards. The motor mount was in a dubious condition but has now been repaired. That is a tough little aeroplane.

Now for the Wizard.

Before I post the event - I must stress that the weather for me was ideal warm (for England), not raining, no bright sun and no wind at all.

By the time I started flying the Wizard - the big boys were coming into land. See as they were at 8,000ft - I don't think they will be reporting near misses.

Four good take offs and four good landings. Here is one of them.



Felt more in control with the Wizard.

But



Nice doggy came to commiserate! Time to call it a day. Battery mounts shattered and motor busted. All repaired now!

I haven't a clue what I did to cause the sudden nose dive!

However, what I notice with the Wizard was that on several occasions, and for no apparent reason, it wobbled. Flying nice and straight and then a wobble. Either line side wing dropping or outside wing lifting. Different places every time and not on every lap.

It wasn't my imagination and when I looked at my videos I couldn't see it. So I got one of them and slowed a section to 1/8 speed. At about 5 minutes (slow speed) you will  see the Wizard flanked by the trees and wobble. Not easy to see in the video but the best I can do. It took me ages to work out how to slow the thing down and You Tuv=be plays around with the uploaded videos.



Now for all those reluctant to fly control line - if I can do, so can you! I will show my escapades - Warts 'n all - but, take note, I enjoyed myself spinning around even if I did prang two planes. They are both repaired now.
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Re: Crash, bang wallop and crappy pictures.

Post  Cribbs74 on Sat Jun 11, 2016 5:00 pm

Ian,

Try flying at about 6' off the ground. When you get up high things move much faster. I fly quite a bit and even I get a bit dizzy when I fly above 45 degrees. A bit, but not too bad.

Go slow on controls, be sure your handle line spacing is correct. Things don't happen overnight.

While your eyesight may hinder you some, keep in mind combat guys fly by feel a lot of the time. Also keep in mind that many older guys are still flying quite well.

Don't get discouraged, just keep at it and most of all enjoy! Crashes will happen, just laugh it off.


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Re: Crash, bang wallop and crappy pictures.

Post  ian1954 on Sun Jun 12, 2016 10:11 am

It isn't putting me off, I like a challenge but there is something I have either got horribly wrong or I am doing horribly wrong but I cannot see it.

For example - straight and level and the Wizard flies fine except for that occasional waggle. The lines feel fine but, then again, I don't know what fine is. These models are hardly likely to pull my arm off (touch wood!).

I have just watched Windy's video on bench trimming and found some of it enlightening.

https://www.coxengineforum.com/t9855-windy-s-stunt-model-bench-trimming-advice

The battery on the Wizard is quite a heavy beast and was strapped low down like a bomb. A big bomb for that size model - it weighs in at 3 1/2 ounces. I watched Windy's comments on vertical cg and how having the cg below centre line was a bad thing and could cause the plane to drop the inside wing. I have to be conscious that took a model designed for an 049, electrickeried it and strapped a bloody great battery to the bottom. Must have consequences.

I was also flying on 35 ft lines - maybe a bit too long for the Ace but I was too lazy to carry out two sets of lines! Also the lines weigh next to nothing and the they seemed the right length to keep the lap time down.

The Veron Combateer is under construction and the Frog Aerobat only needs a few bits of wood and covering. I also have the ARTF Noble that would only take about four hours to slap together.

This was the Aerobat two years ago



The Combateer as of yesterday



I am reluctant to finish these until I have got to grips with the two little toughies. The Aerobat, Combateer and the Nobler would not survive the two nose dives I caused yesterday. The electric motor I killed yesterday was around £5 - the ones for these models are way more expensive.

It is all a learning exercise but If I finish one of the above - I will rush to fly it.
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Re: Crash, bang wallop and crappy pictures.

Post  fredvon4 on Sun Jun 12, 2016 11:06 am

Not sure from the videos or your flying descriptions that the low hung battery is a primary problem... at speed, if it was a significant differential, the inner wing would be low and the plane would always want to come chase you with very loose lines

Of course if you can shift it up, you might gain some line tension and perhaps then can reduce engine or rudder offset

On the bigger planes zero offset is usually preferred and tension is mostly centipede force and proper CG and Line rake position... once trimmed this way most of the various maneuvers in the hemisphere will track correctly

on a 1/2a ish trainer the initial baby steps can be easier of the plane wants to fly the circle and not fight or oppose all the forces

I know you are space limited but if you decide this is just so much fun you want to feel fully in control, I highly recommend the bigger stunt planes

Another thought is to get one of the bigger 1/2a foam wing combat wings and tame the fast turning with a strong engine and 37 to 40~42 foot lines

Once I stopped propping for screaming 80~90 MPH flights and always a second or two BEHIND the plane and used a more sedate prop and launch RPM I was able to hold on for 3 or 4 minuets and feel more in control and start dong more then climb and dive

I also think the various coroplast 1/2a trainers are worth the $4 to make and go beat the hell out of
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Re: Crash, bang wallop and crappy pictures.

Post  roddie on Sun Jun 12, 2016 12:31 pm

Good to see that you're enjoying flying C/L Ian! Something to try; next time out.. It's hard "not" to focus intently on the model in flight. This "will" cause dizziness because of the background being blurred. The background appears to move while the model appears stationary. This will mess with you BIG TIME! Instead.. be conscious of this phenomenon.. and focus on "segments" of the background.. and let the model fly into and out-of them. Ballet dancers apply this technique when performing pirouetts (spinning on one foot) to avoid getting dizzy. Try dividing your flight-path up into eight 45-degree imaginary segments.. six 60-degree segments.. or four 90-degree segments.. whichever feels more comfortable. Shift your eyes rather than intently staring straight ahead.
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